Morningness Eveningness Questionnaire
Are you a Night Owl or a Morning Lark?

The timing of our sleep is governed by our internal body clock known as the circadian rhythm. But not everyone’s circadian rhythm acts in the same way. Scientists have shown that we have a biological tenancy to prefer staying up later, waking up earlier, or have what’s considered a normal sleep pattern.

Morningness Eveningness QuestionnaireThe Morningness Eveningness Questionnaire below is a popular test used by sleep doctors to assess whether or not a patient is a night owl, a morning lark, or in between, and to what extent.

To take the test, just fill out the form below and press calculate to receive your result. The test assumes you have a regular sleep schedule, but if you don’t, answer the questions with the timing of your preferred sleep schedule free from any commitments.

 

Q1. Considering only your own “feeling best” rhythm, at what time would you get up if you were entirely free to plan your day?

5am – 6:30am
6:30am to 7:45am
7:45am – 9:45am
9:45am – 11am
11am – 12pm

Q2. Considering only your own “feeling best” rhythm, at what time would you go to bed if you were entirely free to plan your evening?

8pm – 9pm
9pm – 10:15pm
10:15pm – 12:30am
12:30am – 1:45am
1:45am – 3am

Q3. If there is a specific time at which you have to get up in the morning, to what extent are you dependant on being woken up by an alarm clock?

Not al all dependent
Slightly dependent
Fairly dependent
Very dependent

Q4. Assuming adequate environmental conditions, how easy do you find getting up in the mornings?

Not at all easy
Not very easy
Fairly easy
Very easy

Q5. How alert do you feel during the first half hour after having woken in the mornings?

Not at all alert
Slightly alert
Fairly alert
Very alert

Q6. How is your appetite during the first half-hour after having woken in the mornings?

Very poor
Fairly poor
Fairly good
Very good

Q7. During the first half-hour after having woken in the morning, how tired do you feel?

Very tired
Fairly tired
Fairly refreshed
Very refreshed

Q8. When you have no commitments the next day, at what time do you go to bed compared to your usual bedtime?

Seldom or never later
Less than one hour later
1 – 2 hours later
More than two hours later

Q9. You have decided to engage in some physical exercise. A friend suggests that you do this one hour twice a week and the best time for him is between 7am – 8am. Bearing in mind nothing else but your own “feeling best” rhythm, how do you think you would perform?

Would be on good form
Would be on reasonable form
Would find it difficult
Would find it very difficult

Q10. At what time in the evening do you feel tired and as a result in need for sleep?

8pm – 9pm
9pm – 10:15pm
10:15pm – 12:45am
12:45am – 2am
2am – 3pm

Q11. You wish to be at your peak performance for a test which you know is going to be mentally exhausting and lasting for two hours. You are entirely free to plan your day and considering only your own “feeling best” rhythm, which one of the four test times would you choose?

8am – 10am
11am – 1pm
3pm – 5pm
7pm – 9pm

Q12. If you went to bed at 11pm, at what level of tiredness would you be?

Not at all tired
A little tired
Fairly tired
Very tired

Q13. For some reason you have gone to bed several hours later than usual, but there is no need to get up at any particular time the next morning. Which one of the following events are you most likely to experience?

Will wake up at usual time and will not fall asleep
Will wake up at usual time and will doze thereafter
Will wake up at usual time but will fall asleep again
Will not wake up until later than usual

Q14. One night you have to remain awake between 4am – 6am in order to carry out a night watch. You have no commitments the next day. Which one of the following alternatives will suit you best?

Would not got to bed until watch was over
Would take a nap before and sleep after
Would take a good sleep before and nap after
Would take all sleep before watch

Q15. You have to do two hours of hard physical work. You are entirely free to plan your day and considering only your own “feeling best” rhythm, which one of the following times would you choose?

8am – 10am
11am – 1pm
3pm – 5pm
7pm – 9pm

Q16. You have decided to engage in hard physical exercise. A friend suggests that you do this for one hour twice a week and the best time for him is between 10pm – 11pm. Bearing in mind nothing else but your own “feeling best” rhythm, how well do you think you would perform?

Would be on good form
Would be on reasonable form
Would find it difficult
Would find it very difficult

Q17. Suppose that you can choose your own work hours. Assume that you worked a five hour day (including breaks) and that your job was interesting and paid by results. What time would you finish?

5am – 8am
9am
10am – 2pm
3pm – 5pm
6pm – 4am

Q18. At what time of the day do you think that you reach your “feeling best” peak?

10pm – 4am
5am – 7am
8am – 9am
10am – 4pm
5pm – 9pm

Q19. One hears about “morning” and “evening” types of people. Which one of these types do you consider yourself to be?

Definitely a morning type
Rather more a morning than an evening type
Rather more an evening than a morning type
Definitely an evening type

Adapted from: Horne, J.A.; Östberg, O. (1976). A self-assessment questionnaire to determine morningness-eveningness in human circadian rhythms”. Int J Chronobiol 4 (2): 97–110

You Scored:

Results

Here’s what your score means:

ScoreResult
16 – 30Definitely Evening Type
31 – 41Moderately Evening Type
42 – 58Neither Type
59 – 69Moderately Morning Type
70 – 86Definitely Morning Type

 

It’s understood that 70% of us are neither larks or owls, and have what can be considered to be a normal sleep routine. 20% of us are night owls, with a preference for staying up late into the night, and sleep in late as a result. 10% are considered morning larks, people who feel their best early morning, often falling asleep earlier than most.

Whether we are larks or owls tends to change as we age. Teenagers and adolescents are more likely to be night owls, and as we get older, we have a natural tendency to become morning larks. So if you retake this test in a few years time, you might find your result has shifted one way or another.

Knowing whether you’re a night owl, morning lark or neither can be worked towards your advantage. Night owls are more productive during the night, where as morning larks are more productive during the morning. By scheduling high intensity tasks at your peak times you can effectively get more done. If you have flexible work commitments you may find it useful to either shift your sleep timing forwards or backwards to best take advantage of your most productive times.

Society is traditionally morning centric with early morning appointments or commitments being the norm. This however does seem to be changing with a new shift into 24 hour lifestyles. People can now work and rest at whatever time they want. Targeting job opportunities that provide the best match for your sleep pattern can give you a distinct advantage in the workplace.

There are some important considerations to keep in mind. Hardcore owls or larks have a higher risk of developing a circadian rhythm disorder, where by they stay up later and later or go to bed earlier and earlier, until their sleep pattern goes out of control. This can be an issue for owls who need to be up in the morning, or for larks who need to stay awake into the evening. If you’re a hardcore lark or owl, take great care not to let your sleep pattern slip too much in any one direction.